Lab #10

Part One: Pruning

1. As a college student who studies in downtown Montreal, I come face-to-face with people who live on the streets every day. To get to and from school, I push through scrambling passengers in the furnace we call a metro and pass countless people asking for food or change. While I come across homeless people all the time, I’ve come to question whether I actually see them. Even though most people in the city walk by people begging for money or holding up signs asking for food, it rarely provokes any reaction whatsoever.

2. As a college student who studies in downtown Montreal, I come face-to-face with people who live on the streets every day.  However, I’ve come to question whether I actually see them. Even though most people in the city walk by people begging for money or holding up signs asking for food, it rarely provokes any reaction whatsoever.

1.While I do tend to ignore homeless people, I know that I don’t wish them harm. If you asked me if I wanted to help their situation, I’d definitely say yes. So why do I distance myself from them? According to Toro’s findings, about 60 percent of the people he questioned were willing to pay more taxes to help the homeless. However, while the abstract idea of helping homeless people attracts support, a real encounter with homeless people often repels. In reality, poverty is an ugly thing. Acknowledging the individuals you see on the streets means acknowledging the huge social issue they’re part of.

2. If you asked me if I wanted to help homeless people, I’d say yes. So why do I distance myself from them? According to Toro’s findings, about 60 percent of the people questioned were willing to pay more taxes to help the homeless. However, while the abstract idea of helping homeless people attracts support, a real encounter with a homeless person often repels. Poverty is an ugly thing. Acknowledging the person you see on the street means acknowledging the social issue they’re part of.

Part Two: Ending it with Style

It seems that communication and a sense of community is key. By separating ourselves from people on the street, we’re choosing to contribute to the huge social issue we’re trying to ignore. Sure, ignoring the woman stretched out on the metro floor may be less upsetting, but recognizing that she is an individual could be a start to helping the issue. Actually noticing the people who hold up signs in the metro and recognizing that their situation as part of a bigger social issue could be the beginning to breaking down the barrier between “them” and “us”. We all need to take responsibility for what is happening in our community. Let’s give them a home before we give them a house.

Part Three: The First Sentence

1. From the top of the metro escalators, I could see her stretched out on the floor, laughing and groaning.

2. The woman stretched out on the metro floor groaned and I looked ahead.

3. Stretched out on the metro floor, the woman groaned and laughed.

4. All the other commuters and I walked past the woman lying on the floor.

 

 

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